Mogavero Architects

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Work

Lexington Apartments

This mixed use project in Davis has 122 student apartments and 3,100 square feet of ground floor commercial space combined with central common areas to provide opportunities for social contact between student residents and create a friendly community feel. Common facilities that include a community building with recreation and exercise facilities, a laundry, and open study rooms were placed in key locations to enliven the project site and provide natural surveillance by the residents for added safety. The site allows for excellent non-vehicular connection to the UC Davis campus and was designed to be pedestrian oriented with wide, shaded sidewalks, narrow drives, and hidden parking in several locations. Retail and office space on the ground floor establish an interface with the street, and the 3-story residence buildings were designed to allow for maximum connection between buildings and landscape with porches in varied positions, generous balconies and covered walkways that penetrate buildings. The residences are a combination of ground floor flats and 2-story townhouses. The units were designed to provide extra privacy and living space for student lifestyles, balancing the needs of quiet study time with (sometimes loud) social activities.

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UC Davis Tercero 2 Student Housing

Our firm was charged with developing a program and implementing an interactive schematic design process for this 592 bed, dormitory style student housing project. The resultant LEED Gold project incorporates 30% water and energy savings along with storm water detention and treatment, natural ventilation, recycled materials and on-site renewable energy. Our firm provided site massing studies and constructability value analyses followed by an area-wide site planning effort that organizes existing and future housing projects on the UC Davis campus. The project creates community at ascending levels, accommodating differing comfort levels while allowing for varying levels of resident interaction. Plans encourage social engagement, balancing accessibility and safety with the need for solitude. Common spaces are carefully located with spatial visibility as a goal: a place to see and to be seen while contributing to a greater sense of community. In this way, students are able to establish a sense of ownership, taking care of their ‘home’ while being engaged with their surroundings. Floor plans from the University’s recent housing projects were analyzed as a way of developing prototypical clusters of student rooms, serving as building blocks for floor configuration and amenity layout. Window seats reinforce hallways as gathering spaces, defining each cluster while working in concert with the building’s passive ventilation system. Hallways end in vistas to the campus community, providing an open, airy feel to corridors and connection to the campus at large. New cluster design with window seats Sustainable site drainage‚ percolation swales, pervious concrete Motion detector ramp up/dim down Hallway lighting Natural ventilation system using stair towers to circulate air Beat Title 24 by more than 32% Daylight harvesting Natural ventilation system Solar water heating

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7th & H Affordable Housing

Our firm led a multi-disciplinary team of design professionals for this eight-story mid-rise, mixed-use project for Mercy Housing California. Located in downtown Sacramento and surrounded by myriad government and industrial land uses, this post-tensioned concrete building consists of 150 affordable residential individual units atop a clinic space for residents and accompanied by ground floor retail. The project sought to build a community within the building, contribute to the vibrancy of the neighborhood, and connect to the community at large. We achieved this through a variety of design approaches, including an activated streetscape, well-designed, visible common area spaces and distinct community rooms and balconies on the upper floors. The unique Z shape plan creates two large landscaped outdoor terraces on the second floor. The clinic on the ground floor is designated for resident use as part of a comprehensive wellness program for this special needs resident group. The roof is crowned by a dramatic solar panel array that provides energy to heat water and power the building. Our team’s passion for sustainable design coupled with our integrated design approach for building, energy and water systems provide a high-level of comfort for residents, provide for improved indoor air quality, and allow for efficient day lighting to deliver occupant satisfaction at very low operating costs. Using collaborative, integrated design practices and strategies helped to reduce the project’s ecological footprint and allowed us to achieve a truly green building, while satisfying all the programmatic goals.

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Capitol Yards

Located just over the Tower Bridge from downtown Sacramento, The Capitol Yards is a market rate apartment development that is designed to inspire community in an urban setting, embracing the concept of ‘together alone’ with a variety of indoor and outdoor spaces and unit configurations. There are two building types in two phases: phase 1 consists of courtyard buildings that include 270 studio, one and two bedroom and penthouse units; and phase 2, our Tower Bridge Gateway building, four stories tall with structured parking that includes live/work, studio, one and two bedroom and penthouse units. Combined, both phases will build out to 350 units. The courtyard buildings are under construction. Each pair of buildings is arranged on the site to create pedestrian courtyards with facing porches and front doors, site furnishings and amenities such as barbeques, fountains, pool, spa and a stage. Spaces can accommodate individuals or groups and are themed with varying plant palettes. The courtyard buildings have tuck-under, garage parking, dramatically reducing the amount of paved surface on the site. The dwelling units wrap around the parking on the ground floor on three sides of the buildings. These end wraps narrow the aperture of alley entrances, creating building frontages at the street and providing a neighborhood context that is not interrupted by massive parking areas or excessive driveways

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The Arbors

The Arbors at Oak Park is a senior, mixed-use project in Sacramento on a prominent corner with in the Oak Park neighborhood. This mixed-use redevelopment project is an important and highly visible component of the continuing revitalization of Oak Park, Sacramento’s first “street car suburb.”  It contains 56 one bedroom units of affordable, senior housing with ground floor retail. To mark the re-connection of the site to the community, the project features active, pedestrian oriented retail shops that focus on a “living room” at the courtyard the corner of MLK and Broadway.  The streets are lined with landscaping providing a comfortable and welcoming pedestrian environment. Designed to improve the sense of safety, the project activates the street frontage with ground floor retail. By providing over thirty units with windows and balconies that front directly on the street, much needed life is given to the neighborhood. The building is designed to maximize comfort and health for the senior occupants.  Features such as south facing sunshades, natural day lighting, flow through ventilation and ample community spaces, make the project both comfortable and energy efficient.

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Maple Park

Tucked away in rural Live Oak in Sutter County, and a few blocks from the main avenue, were 30 wartime-era affordable housing units that were falling apart and slowly becoming abandoned. It was determined that rehabilitation was unfeasible and the site was transformed, providing 56 units of low income family housing in 3 story buildings. The property is surrounded by a pedestrian friendly loop road and complemented by a central open space and community building. An agricultural vernacular is expressed in the buildings with expansive shed roofs, citrus accent colors and a playful mix of siding patterns. Garden areas and courtyards allow residents to grow their own food, socialize and build community. The project consists of 2, 3, and 4 bedroom units with a central community building that contains a daycare facility for preschoolers. Each unit has storage, a private patio or balcony, and a washer/dryer.  The buildings face narrow, pedestrian friendly streets and create park-like courts of various sizes.  Parking is tucked under the buildings and does not dominate the site. Given the lack of municipal storm drainage, all runoff is retained and allowed to infiltrate the site, and numerous green features are incorporated into the design: energy performance 26-30% above T24; Green Point Rated 118pts.; low VOC materials and finishes; high thermal mass design; variable speed HVAC fans; ceiling fans; energy star appliances; low E dual pane operable windows and shades; construction/demolition waste reduction; efficient lighting; materials with recycled content; water conserving fixtures; a community garden;  and water conserving landscape. The project is designed to accommodate future solar hot water and photovoltaic systems which will make it a Net Zero community. Designed to create a centrally located community space the site includes a new community building as the focal point, with a portion of the building dedicated to day care for up to 20 pre-school aged children who participate in the local Head Start Program.  Adult education classes for project residents are held in the adjacent, larger rooms.  Outdoor open spaces are located near existing trees and have become small courts that subdivide the site into smaller communities.  Gum Street, which previously was a dead end, has been extended through the site to create a stronger connection with the surrounding neighborhood. The private, narrow driveway-like loop slows cars and creates a safe pedestrian oriented space. All unit entries are visible from the street and create focal points for informal interaction and gathering.

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McKinley Village Clubhouse

2017 Gold Winner – NAHB’s Best in American Living Awards McKinley Village is an urban village in the core of Sacramento that combines the qualities of the city’s most successful urban neighborhoods with design features that give this neighborhood distinctive character. The 4,200 sf recreation center for a community of 328 homes serves as the community’s civic center; offering a pool, community gathering space, and an area for retail use such as a cafe, restaurant, or yoga studio. Bikeways and walkways stitch together the neighborhood and connect McKinley Village, McKinley Park, Midtown, Sutter’s Landing Park and the American River Parkway. The design of the Recreation Center enhances the character of East Sacramento, with distinguishing neighborhoods like McKinley Park, Meister Terrace and East Portal Park. As the neighborhood’s community facility, the building was designed with sweeping roof forms and deep overhands that define and engage outdoor spaces while also shading large expanses of glass. The building’s design is enriched by details such as brick patterning, expressive structure, and interconnection to the site. Natural Ventilation The McKinley Recreation Center is a 4,200 sf clubhouse with a 34’ tall passive downdraft cooling tower. The tower takes advantage of the prevailing winds, plus the higher relative density of cold air to create passive cooling at a tiny fraction of the cost of traditional mechanical cooling. Air enters the top of the tower where evaporation from a wet medium cools the air. The heavy cold air then naturally falls down the tower into the space below. The building’s control systems regulate the tower intake. Hot air is exhausted through motorized windows at the top of monitors on the north and down wind side of the building. The resulting system is very simple to operate and maintain because it relies on natural movement of hot and cold air rather than energy intensive compression cooling of the space. It also allows the building to be open to the outdoors during many of the warmer months.

Blog

Mogavero Architects: Why we do what we do

It had been a year and a half since our last retreat and Renner Johnston,Mogavero President, and I (Lisa Halpin, Associate, Architect), felt we had been toonose-to-the-grindstone with our day-to-day tasks. We needed to step back andrevisit the Mogavero Architect’s “why.” Not only why the companyexists in the first place (thanks, David Mogavero), but why we continue todesign and operate with such passion today. As we were planning the retreat, it was clear that we needed to find alocation that reflected our “why.” What better place than one of ourown projects? Cashin’s Field recently opened with 51 affordable rental unitsand a central community center – which our client graciously opened to us forthe day. The project is beautifully situated in Nevada City, lending theopportunity to get away from our desks and see one of our projects in actionwith a true “retreat” feeling of being in the mountains. The day’s activities were structured around Simon Sinek‘s book “Start withWhy” which encourages individuals and groups to center themselvesaround why they do what they do, instead of focusing on the whator the how. So, for one day we put down our pencils, left ourcomputers, and talked about the things that make us most proud to be designers. Peter Oliver, Architect and Code Specialist, shared a story from the SantaFe Commons grand opening, an 81-unit affordable housing project with 25 permanentsupportive housing units for those transitioning from homelessness. Aresident talked about her journey from an abusive relationship which led to herbeing un-housed…until finally she was able to move into a brand-new apartmentat a rental rate she could afford by herself! Another shared a story aboutseeing the ripple effect of our projects: in this case, one unit serving asenior who could now take care of their grandchild during the day so theirchild could go to work. Something that makes me proud of our workplace isseeing one of my intern mentees graduate from college and continually developher skills and maturity as a full-time designer working towards herlicense. Why do we do what we do? It’s hard to put feelings into words, but here is anattempt: We want to leave a legacy of inspiring places for people thatcontribute to a sustainable future. We have a diverse and inclusive companythat we love showing up to every day. In short: We envision communities thatconnect people and place, empowering them to write their own stories.

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Celebrating Black History Month: James C. Dodd, Architectural Pioneer

We’re taking the opportunity to celebrate Black History Month this year by sharing the work of a significant driving force for architectural design and innovation in our community – the prolific and trailblazing local architect, James C. Dodd Sr., FAIA. James C. Dodd Sr., FAIA, NOMA, is recognized as Sacramento’s first Black registered architect and is responsible for several architecturally notable buildings around the city. Born in Texas, Dodd received his architecture degree from the University of California, Berkeley in 1952 after being discharged from the US Army. Following his relocation to Sacramento, Dodd practiced as a Draftsman with the State Division of Architecture and later joined the local firm Barovetto & Thomas before then starting his own practice, James C. Dodd and Associates. Over the firm’s nearly 40-year span, Dodd’s work gained notoriety in the Mid-Century Modern and Brutalist movements, with many examples of his work later earning a place on local and national registers of historic significance. In the later years of his career, Dodd expanded his practice to include affordable housing developments, places of worship, historic rehabilitation projects, and schools. Dodd was licensed to practice architecture in several states and served on the Board of Governors of the California Community Colleges and the Sacramento City Board of Education. Dodd was a founding member and contributed to the Charter of the National Organization of Minority Architects (NOMA), which still operates to this day. Notable examples of James C. Dodd’s work around Sacramento include the Shiloh Baptist Church, the Sacramento Convention Center complex, renovations to Sacramento High School, and the Nathaniel Colley Building, which served as the law offices of Nathaniel Colley, one of Sacramento’s first Black lawyers and is the current home to the Sacramento Black Chamber of Commerce. Dodd’s contribution to architecture in the Sacramento region and beyond is immeasurable and has had a lasting positive impact on the architectural community as a whole. We are honored to share this field’s space with such a talented, visionary individual and to bring a little piece of his story to you today. Happy Black History Month! #BlackHistoryMonth #JamesCDodd #BlackArchitects #NOMA #Architecture #Engineering #Design #Sacramento

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Broadway 39 Construction Update

Located on Broadway in the historic Oak Park neighborhood of Sacramento, this project is new construction for affordable senior housing. The Arbors, an affordable senior housing project designed by Mogavero and completed in 2013, is located directly across 39th Street. The unit design, exterior building form, and amenities of Broadway 39 are designed to reflect and complement the neighboring Arbors project from 11 years ago, with the intent that the two projects form one larger community of seniors. Both projects are developed by one of our long-standing developer partners, Related, and are to be managed by the same company, John Stewart Company. The three-story, elevator-served building includes 43 residential units, a community room, management offices, bicycle storage room, trash collection room, and laundry facilities. The apartments are a mixture of studio units and one-bedroom units. The project took advantage of density bonus allowances because of its proximity to one of the best-used bus transit lines that operates along the Stockton Boulevard-Broadway Transit Corridor. The project site is comprised of three parcels making use of land from SHRA as well as property from a neighboring church that has long envisioned more affordable housing in their neighborhood. A public alley separates the two parcels on the west side from the parcel on the east side. The two parcels west of the alley have been merged. The east parcel contains the parking lot. Two additional parking spaces are provided at the west side of the alley. Designed and constructed according to Cal Green standards, this development is all-electric. Solar power will be provided by SMUD’s Neighborhood SolarShares program. The building design incorporates a clean, modern aesthetic that contributes to the urban fabric along the Broadway corridor. Exterior finish materials include stucco, horizontal fiber cement, and limited metal roofing. The exterior color palette includes a base of warm neutrals with bold orange accents at the building entrances. The site design allows several mature trees to remain, including a large oak tree providing shade at the parking lot. Landscape improvements include a community garden, courtyard patio with trellis for barbeques, shade structure with a garden shed, sunken lawn (which serves as both an outdoor amenity space and stormwater detention basin), and water-efficient trees and plants. As we reach the halfway point in the construction schedule, we are excited to share significant milestones achieved over the past six months. The slab and building framing are nearly complete, showcasing the structural foundation of our vision.  On the exterior, the current focus is ensuring a watertight building to allow interior trades to work during the wet winter months. The weather-resistant barrier installation is in the final stages and is set to be completed in early February. Simultaneously, fiber cement siding finish is wrapping up with an anticipated completion date in early February as well. After some rain delays, the TPO roof is being installed and is projected to be completed in mid-February.  The next phases involve rough MEP work, covering of electrical wiring, access control and security, low voltage, and fire alarms. This stage—requiring intricate coordination of multiple trades—is scheduled to kick off in February and extend into March. With all the progress, the building is steadily taking shape. Stay tuned for more updates on this exciting journey with a projected completion date of May 30, 2024!