Mogavero Architects

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Work

Dawson Drive

Dawson Drive, a key corridor in the City’s industrial area, was master planned for revitalization, including a set of design standards and improvements that will, when implemented, create a vibrant, mixed use district that services a variety of land uses. Entry monuments identify the area, particularly as it is accessed from Highway 101, and visually links the Plan area to Camarillo’s downtown. Over time, it is envisioned that the concepts and design guidelines will encourage property owners, businesses and residents to improve properties and create infill development that will unify the area and create stronger linkages to the City at large.

Work

Good Project

Good is a high-density residential project in West Sacramento with a site plan that includes 33 single-family detached homes and two duplexes with a mix of two and three-story building types. With ground floor garages, each home has living areas and a balcony on the second level with bedrooms on the ground floor as well as on the second or third floors. Each of the homes has elevated front stoops that are situated along an internal lane similar to the historic alley pattern of the surrounding neighborhood. Unique to this project site are four large oak trees on the southwest corner of the site that have been preserved within an urban park. The park is an asset for the project, but also serves as a front porch to the community. The site has a community garden and open space situated around four heritage oak trees and an urban park. The park serves as a front porch to the community and can be observed by ground floor studios or offices and second floor decks.

Work

Metro Square

Located near downtown Sacramento, Metro Square was developed through a partnership between a merchant builder and the local redevelopment agency. This infill market-rate single family housing project helped transform the central city housing market. The project featured 45 single family homes on 2.2 acres (21 dwelling units to the acre) which ranged in size from 1,150 square feet to 1,550 square feet. Each unit has a front porch, a small private backyard, and a one or two car garage tucked under the unit. The 2-story homes offered two to three bedrooms, and up to two and one half baths. Some plans featured dual master suites, den/library or private decks. The Redevelopment Agency loaned the developer $1.2 million to reduce the land costs and mitigate the risk of building in the central city rather than in the suburbs. Architectural design balanced contemporary construction needs with the existing character of the neighborhood. A central courtyard serves as a focal point for community interaction. The street appearance of the project conformed to that of an early 20th century residential neighborhood, while the interior emphasized community interaction and contemporary development. This project included primarily one car garages discouraging auto ownership, roof orientation for photovoltaic retrofits, surface drainage to reduce water pollutants, and architectural character sympathetic to the existing neighborhood. Making it more inviting to pedestrians and bicyclists, Metro Square has connected streets, bicycle network markings, crosswalks and other traffic controls at intersections, traffic-calming measures, and shade trees along its sidewalks.

Work

1015 20th Street

1015 20th Street is an urban infill renovation project, in the heart of Sacramento’s  Midtown district, with historic preservation criteria, seismic and structural updates, and significant changes in building purpose all wrapped into one through our holistic design approach. The project consisted of renovation of a 70-year-old, 10,700 square foot mortuary building that is on the City of Sacramento’s Historic Preservation List. At the beginning of the project, this building was a one-story, masonry brick volume, with a historic façade directly addressing the street. The building now has two stories of interior office space, with significant daylighting to create a pleasant and efficient working environment, nicely marrying current urban vocabularies with the subtly-enhanced historic façade. The seismic and structural retrofit work was  accomplished leaving the  historic character untouched, and integrates well with the contemporary æsthetics of the new rear steel stair, making this solution integral to the design rather than simply being added on.  Second floor area was created with the addition of a penthouse structure, designed to be in keeping with the building’s historic character, yet without being directly imitative or derivative in nature; this structure also allows for a contemporary interior feel with excellent daylighting. Creative design solutions were required to provide seismic safety in the historic building with tight budget constraints.

Work

Sacramento Natural Foods Co-Op

For this exciting project we designed improvements to an existing vacant 16,000 square foot building to accommodate a grocery store and food court restaurant area. The food court is designed for several small restaurant tenants and a florist. Both spaces have indoor and outdoor seating and a small stage. The grocery store can be closed off from the food court so that food service can continue in the food court past normal business hours. In addition, there are spaces for stocking, food prep, offices and restrooms. The two areas are quite distinct, yet unified by the use of a floor grid pattern which begins at the entry. The scale of the grid changes upon entering the restaurant eating area to a smaller pattern which helps to personalize this space. The pattern also changes toward the rear of the grocery store as it passes into the specialty foods area. Skylights are used throughout both store and restaurant areas to provide natural daylighting. A system of ceiling banners was designed to provide signage and create a light and airy atmosphere.

Work

Coffee Works

The design for this remodel and expansion communicated the company’s central identity as a roaster of fine coffee while expanding opportunities for on-site retail sales. The facade was redesigned to incorporate more light and visual identity into what was an older, utilitarian commercial building. The roaster and cafe now has an airy feeling indoors and new opportunities for seating outdoors. Usable space was expanded from 2,000 to 4,000 square feet. The exterior space, adjacent to Folsom Boulevard and an adjoining alley, has been defined by an overhead trellis and a large planter along the alley’s edge. Interior improvements included increased seating for patrons– from four to 20 seats–while still emphasizing the roaster and coffee bean sales.

Work

Urban League of Sacramento

Our firm provided architecture and development management services for The Greater Sacramento Urban League. The shape of the Urban League building expresses the many sustainable design techniques used throughout the structure and illustrates a comprehensive approach to sustainable architecture. Incorporating classrooms, offices, an auditorium, child care facility and support services, the Urban League facility is energy efficient as well as humanistic. The Urban League was willing to forgo a traditional, mechanically conditioned space for long-term energy and economic savings. The building was designed to take advantage of a mild year-round climate and features spaces that transition smoothly between indoors and outdoors. Programmatically, the atrium volume forms a sheltered entry spine and an opportunity to organize vertical and horizontal circulation through the entry, lobby and gathering spaces. The temperate lobby space is designed to release warm summer air and keep out cooler winter air. Critical to this design is the open geometry at the intersection of the roof and walls. The atrium fabric and glass roof was designed to provide venturi and gravity effects to enhance summer ventilation. Through the use of large openings at the east and west walls at street level, air flow is allowed through the space. Daylight harvesting was woven into the program, providing light to virtually every space in the building. A photovoltaic power generation system cut lighting costs even further. A radiant hydronic heating system provides additional comfort during winter months. Community goals incorporated into the design of the facility include: pedestrian connections to the site and neighborhood; reduced energy and maintenance costs and formal and informal spaces serving the neighborhood.

Work

SMUD Customer Service Center

The SMUD customer service center is a LEED Platinum building that exemplifies our firm’s commitment to sustainable architecture. The facility includes customer service administrative offices, personnel service and energy efficiency departments as well as an Energy Education Center with a hands-on learning museum and retail space. This project utilizes state-of-the-art workplace technology, including worker accessible controls for outdoor and indoor air flow with operable windows, indoor air temperature controls, lighting, and access to varied work environments beyond the usual cubicle. As a result of these measures, staff absenteeism has been reduced by 33%.

Work

Cosumnes River Preserve

This project involved the design of a 3400 sq. ft. Administration and Visitor Center for the Nature Conservancy’s Cosumnes River Preserve. The design process involved close collaboration with private environmental entities and government agencies who jointly manage the Preserve, including The Nature Conservancy, Bureau of Land Management, State Parks and Recreation, County Parks and Recreation, and Ducks Unlimited. The structure, which serves as a central access point for visitors to the nature preserve, features an exhibit space, meeting room, administrative offices, and restrooms. The joint management style of the Preserve has been incorporated into the design of the interior administrative office space. A roofed outdoor deck provides an additional interpretive display area. The structure was designed to encompass the vernacular of the Center’s rural agrarian and riparian setting. The Center’s security needs have been addressed by controlling access to the trail system to provide a balance between surveillance of the preserve and access to the grounds.

Work

Del Paso Sport Park Complex

This award-winning complex includes four night-lighted diamonds with press boxes and bleachers, with a seating capacity of seven thousand between the four diamonds. It is actively used for regional and national softball tournaments and by local leagues on weeknights. Sycamore trees spaced around the buildings provide an arched canopy offering a cooling oasis from the intense summer sun of the Central Valley. The roof provides deep overhangs to shade the substantial glass frontage and doubles as an outdoor shade area, with outdoor seating for concession customers. The building acts as a highly-visible gateway to the complex from the parking area, and provides office space for the complex manager, a meeting room, a control center for tournaments and a lounge / changing area for umpires. The announcer booths / press boxes were designed as small, two-story structures overlooking each diamond with controls for the individual diamond’s scoreboards, public address and lighting systems. In addition to the playfield area, the project includes a 500-car parking area and a bridge crossing the nearby creek. The concession building was designed as a freestanding restaurant for lease to private operators.