Mogavero Architects

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Work

WEST Apartments

LIVE WEST: The first residential project on the waterfront of the West Sacramento Bridge District. WEST Apartments is a mixed-use project on the Sacramento River across from Raley Field in West Sacramento. The project takes advantage of significant views overlooking the river, Tower Bridge, Raley Field and Downtown Sacramento. The five-story wood-framed building wraps a precast concrete parking garage. 287 residences consist of studios, 1, 2 and 3 bedroom units. Ground floor retail on Riverfront Street provides 8,000 square feet of active street frontage facing the Rivercats Baseball Stadium. The WEST building design features a special treatment of balconies at the building corners. The northwest corner features the main residential entry and a retail plaza at Riverfront and Ballpark. The building corner is capped with a trellis element over a common space terrace on the fifth floor. The project has a variety of private, common, and public open spaces. The private outdoor space around the pool is embraced within the northeast wing of the building. An ornamental iron fence is designed for views to the river and Riverwalk, while also providing a level of privacy and security for the residents. Open spaces on the east side of the project will be integrated into the landscape of the Riverwalk.

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2010 / 2012 K Street

A renovated two story building on K Street houses two unique business; an architecture firm and a recording studio. Mogavero Architects purchased a two-story building in midtown Sacramento and incorporated state of the art renovations to both the exterior and interior of the building. The second floor of the building was renovated to accommodate the Mogavero Architects offices and features the addition of light courts, ergonomic workstations and natural lighting. The existing ceiling was removed to expose the trusses and allowed for the addition of several skylights which help to provide a fresh, invigorating and creative working environment. The ground level of approximately 4,000 sq. ft. was designed to mimic the SOHO/Art Gallery in look and feel and features the latest in both digital and analog recording. Bongo Post handles sound design, music production, ADR, and layback for TV and radio in a facility that was the first of its kind in the Sacramento area. The space is also equipped with ISDN, DSL and Fiber Optic lines for crisp communication with distant project participants. A technologically sophisticated production house that turns out award-winning soundtracks, Bongo Post is equipped with two video suites that feature Avid 9000 Meridian for both Offline + uncompressed Online, a Graphics suite digitally linked with all post rooms, and 2 Audio Post Suites. One of the Audio Post suites has a 5.1 Surround Mixing suite designed with the assistance of the UK architects who built Lenny Kravitz, Sade + Peter Gabriel’s studio. The ground level of the building also houses a garage providing tandem parking spaces and storage. SPECIALIZED APPROACHES Ecologically sensitive techniques were combined with products that also kept green principles in mind. Infill site location Natural daylighting features Natural ventilation features Operable windows and shades Window shading Variable speed HVAC fans Acoustical ceiling panels; 40% recycled content, low V.O.C, and no formaldehyde 90% of the reinforcing bars were of recycled steel Construction/demolition waste programs were in force throughout the project.

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Circle S

Circle S in San Pablo, California is a carefully composed neighborhood plan that provides a diverse mix of affordable and market rate housing, office and retail space, and a childcare facility. This project envisions the creation of a new pedestrian-friendly neighborhood in the heart of San Pablo. The neighborhood plan is carefully composed and provides a diverse mix of affordable and market rate housing, office and retail space and a childcare facility. Through circulation grids and strategically located parks and open spaces, the Plan creates an integrated, cohesive new community. Higher density uses are appropriately placed along San Pablo Avenue and lower density uses lead to the creek, which will be restored into a public park as part of the project. Analysis of the site revealed the importance of several planning elements including street access to San Pablo Boulevard, public access to the creek, views, open space linkages, and adjacencies. The project includes a variety of uses and 368 residential units of a diverse nature as follows: Senior housing apartments, affordable family rental apartments, commercial office/retail shops, market rate modular housing units, and multi-level condominiums. SPECIALIZED APPROACHES Landscape site furniture will consist of high recycled products Plantings will be selected with the intent of reducing water consumption Minimal areas of turf will be strategically employed in the design in keeping with the sustainable landscaping goals A system of bio-swales, curb-cuts and storm water filtration planters will be incorporated along on-site roadways, landscape medians and strategic parts of neighborhood parks to capture runoff from the site, protect Wildcat Creek, and maximize the re-absorption of run-off back into land.

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SMUD 59th Street Corporation Yard

Redevelopment of the 59th Street Corporation Yard is a very unique opportunity for SMUD (Sacramento Municipal Utility District), the immediate neighborhoods and the Greater Sacramento Region. SMUD has for decades been among the most engaged promoters of sustainable development practices in the region. That activity has logically been primarily in the realm of energy efficiency for buildings and process activity. With substantial changes in the economics for alternate energy generation and with state mandates for zero net energy in 2020 and 2030, the need for regional leadership in building energy efficiency has diminished. The need for leadership falls dominantly in the realm of reducing auto dependency. This is a need for which the Corp Yard Redevelopment is optimally positioned to address. Correspondingly, the Light Rail System is completely contained within SMUD’s boundary. A corollary value for SMUD’s in promotion of transit oriented development is that it will increase the percentage of regional growth (ratepayers) captured within the district boundary.

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Royal Oaks TOD

The proposed Royal Oaks TOD (Transit Oriented Development) design redefines the meaning of “edge.” Instead of buffering and transitioning, the design embraces its gritty urbanity and transforms it into a bold, energized community. Straddling the Del Paso Boulevard commercial strip and quieter, residential neighborhoods on Evergreen Street, Royal Oaks TOD is poised for a renaissance of sustainable site planning and architecture: transit oriented development with a public market, kiosks, art walk, shops, office space, live/work homes, apartments and flexible community space. The project envisions a residential development that brings life, scale, and redevelopment to an under-utilized industrial site. Ground floor retail shops line the entrance to a vibrant and eclectic pedestrian-oriented town square adjacent to two iconic residential buildings. As the connection between Arden Way and the light rail station, the north plaza is envisioned to have the highest foot traffic in the community. Able to be programmed for community events, thousands of visitors will be able to discover a place where movies can be projected on a building façade and vendors can sell ethnic foods. Automated kiosks are planned adjacent to open air stalls, selling everything from crafts to food to daily conveniences. Rooftop terraces and garden walls surround and overlook the plaza. The north plaza will become a public focal point, energized by people, art, music, and food.

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Bartlett Commons at The Cannery

Bartlett Commons has won the 2019 Gold Nugget Grand Award for Best Affordable Housing Community (30-60 du/acre), by the Pacific Coast Builders Conference. The community was also honored with a 2018 National Association of Home Builders’ Best in American Living Award, Gold in the Affordable Multifamily category. CFY Development, Inc.’s Bartlett Commons has also received recognition by the Sacramento Business Journal for a 2018 Best Real Estate Projects Award. As part of California’s first farm-to-table new community, The Cannery in Davis, residents benefit from the amenities in the immediate area. Public parks, bike and walking pathways, and a working 7-acre farm are available to tenants; and the adjacent market and Town Center are easily accessible for restaurants and shopping. Bartlett Commons’ affordable one, two and three bedroom apartments, feature 62 rental units. The 2,000 square foot community building with on-site property management, fitness room, classroom and laundry facilities opens to a central courtyard with a playground for children. In line with Davis’ sustainability and environmental focus, The Cannery community began with low-impact land use. The site is the former home of the Hunt-Wesson Tomato Cannery, and its central location is just minutes from UC Davis and downtown Davis. The urban farm surrounding the neighborhood provides residents and local restaurants with fresh seasonal produce, and with help from the Center for Land Based Learning, provides agriculture classes to beginning farmers. Half the units in the project are accessible by applying Universal Design principles and installing an elevator and breezeways between buildings. The proximity to the City of Davis’ network of bicycle and pedestrian paths make it easy for residents to maneuver through the area, providing for less vehicle use. The project exceeds the requirement of one bicycle parking space per bedroom, and provides a variety of parking options for bikes with carts. The buildings are designed with tuck-under parking that shield the view of parking from the surrounding neighborhood.  

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UOP Calaveras Hall Student Housing

Calaveras Hall is latest student housing project on the University of the Pacific campus for Second Year Students. The project houses 381 students in 141 apartment units in two 4-story buildings. The buildings have the feel of a place of higher education, providing for informal interaction with a variety of learning opportunities through differing levels of interface and collaboration. The project unites with the UOP Campus through its architecture, color, materials and pedestrian connections to the main campus. The design reflects esthetic references to the materials and architectural responses of the 1920’s Collegiate Gothic style buildings on campus. The building is of its time without attempting to recreate one of the older campus structures. It succeeds in its connection to the old while communicating an exciting, interesting building for a new generation of students. The visual and physical connection across the river from the main campus helps stitch together the two sides of the university grounds through an entry tower and plaza which functions as a landing point on the north side of the bridge spanning the Stanislaus River. The connectivity to the broader San Joaquin Valley and Delta region is demonstrated through its response to the climate and the landscape which integrates with the adjacent river habitat. The building design is a distinct representation of its residential character while clearly identifying the different programmatic elements within the project. The main “events” of the building are emphasized through form and materials. The tower at the East Entry serves as a beacon to connect the north side of campus across the river. In association with the East Entry tower, a colonnade clearly demonstrates the path of the entry sequence from the east plaza to the main entry point at the center of the linear site. The North Entry is a secondary entrance from the parking area and is an outward face to edge of campus across the recreation fields. The tower form reflects the design of the main East Entry, but at a more modest scale. The common spaces at the heart of community are visually prominent upon approach from the main campus. These congregation areas on the ground floor of the southern wing are identified with greater transparency and a loggia which wraps the spaces, providing a shaded, protected space to congregate during rainy days or the during the hot months in the San Joaquin Valley.

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Sierra Vista Homes Phase I

A new affordable housing community replaces aging buildings and resident facilities, and will provide additional units and amenities for existing and future tenants. The redevelopment includes increased residential density from 9 units to 16 units per acre. Family housing consisting of one, two, three and four bedroom units will be arranged in a pedestrian-focused relationship to garden courts and streets with separated sidewalks. A large community center with pool and adjacent basketball half-court, along with with tot lots and play areas will encourage interaction between families, young children and older generations. The first phase of a 43-acre master plan replaces housing built in the early 1950’s with energy efficient affordable residences centered around common spaces. Secondary paths and routes to the neighborhood elementary school are planned for safe routes to school. Improvements of streetscape, accessible crossings and connections to the greater community will aid in increasing pedestrian pathways to school and public transportation. The site design and current access to public transportation allows the project to pursue parking reductions to one parking space per unit. Bicycle parking has also been provided at one space per unit. Laundry facilities will be provided in the common areas, as well as a hook-up in each unit. All ground floor units are designed to be adaptable, with upper units at 10% accessibility following the same floor plan. Storm water mitigation approaches will help to shape the landscape with bio-swales and retention basins reminiscent of local wetlands. A selection of native plant species has been chosen to support these systems and to provide interpretive learning landscapes for outdoor education. Helping to alleviate the burden of utility expenses and offset the carbon footprint, the project is designed to be Net Zero. Current commitments are at minimum 40% solar PV offset of residential load and 100% common load. Common hot water systems for each building are arranged to support future solar hot water.

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The Lohse Apartments

The Urban Land Institute (ULI) Sacramento honors Mogavero Architects and Mercy Housing California for our work on The Lohse Apartments as the 2019 Suburban Project of the Year. The Lohse Apartments in the City of Roseville accomplishes the goals of the “Downtown Specific Plan” with new residential development, facilities to support the entertainment district, and enhancement of the civic core with restaurants, and retail. The Mercy Housing development is located on one of the catalyst sites identified by the City as priority for implementation of their Downtown Specific Plan. The 4-story building with a total of 58 residential units sits over subterranean parking. The central outdoor court, and the first floor common area have many amenities for the residents. In addition, 2,500 square feet of commercial space is available for retail use. The project was designed to intensify the development footprint along Vernon Street in Downtown Roseville. The design emphasizes a substantial urban scale with larger volumes and more formal brick materials. The building height along the streets is increased along Vernon and Bulen Streets to transition to a more urban district. The design diminishes in scale as it moves from Vernon Street to the alley to recognize the lower scale of the existing uses across the alley and the lowering of the land elevations towards the alley. This is accomplished by reducing the number of stories, and scale of volumes. 150 feet of the 235 linear feet of The Lohse Apartments’ frontage has commercial and active common areas, with a corner pace for outdoor café seating at the ground level. The retail spaces are set back five feet from the sidewalk with a projected canopy above to allow for outdoor sales or additional café seating. The building management office space provides excellent surveillance of the street, building access circulation and common areas. Associated with the main entry to the residential community is space that can function for community events. This common space can be expanded to include the foyer, multipurpose room, or circulation space for special occasions such as Downtown Roseville’s monthly art event. The residential units were designed to have maximized light quality and natural ventilation, with a large percentage of corner units. All units have mechanically augmented nighttime ventilation cooling to take advantage of the cooler nighttime summer temperatures. The City of Roseville created a video highlighting The Lohse and further development projects, including mention of Main Street Plaza also designed by of Mogavero Architects. Check it out here: City of Roseville Video View our blog about the Grand Opening of The Lohse and the artwork displayed throughout the building.

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Lavender Courtyard

Mogavero Architects is proud to have designed Sacramento’s first LGBT-affirming affordable senior housing development. Located in vibrant Midtown — close to transit, downtown and nearby Lavender Heights — Lavender Courtyard by Mutual Housing California  provides 53 energy-efficient residential units for an aging population often displaced by rising housing costs and marginalized in mainstream senior facilities. We believe sustainable design has the power to extend beyond the building envelope and into the heart and soul of community. Lavender Courtyard exemplifies the unification of housing and community building. The project offers a place of social service, meal delivery, community events, cultural heritage, social engagement, landscape, and energy production while providing a safe, and comfortable home for all its residents.   Everyone deserves the opportunity to thrive in place — regardless of income, identity, age or race. We welcome this new addition to our portfolio and much more importantly, to our community. SPECIALIZED APPROACHES Supports healthy Urban Communities Urban infill and transit oriented development Designed around common rooms and a courtyard to enhance community and social engagement Pedestrian and bicycle friendly Ground floor common and commercial street frontage enhances economic opportunity and community interaction Attractive, modern design Promotes safety, comfort and liveliness for residents and neighbors Reduced Impact on environmental resources Focus on reduced energy consumption Designed to achieve zero net energy Designed to achieve rooftop solar PVs Designed to achieve laundry-to-landscape graywater irrigation system Water efficient landscape design Passive solar design approach Natural ventilation On-site storm water management Sustainable streetscape design