Mogavero Architects

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Work

CSUS Riverfront Center / Starbuck’s Coffee

CSUS Riverfront Center Starbucks was the complete transformation of an existing Copy Center in a 75-year-old building into what has become one of the Campus’ social hubs. The 1,300 square-foot Starbucks Café is joined by the Coffee Bar, back-of-house Work Area and a 500 square-foot Community Room with space for 35 students to comfortably gather to socialize of study. Starbucks is adjacent to the Riverfront Center Food Court which was remodeled by Mogavero Architects in 2010. The interior features large-format floor tile floors and reclaimed wood walls and ceilings. There are comfortable built in banquettes and movable seating around tables and built-in dining bars. Large operable windows opening out to the adjacent dining patio provide ample natural ventilation which is assisted by specially controlled fans. Contact switches on the windows tell the cooling or heating portion of the system to shut off when the windows are open. Replacing what were universally known as “the worst toilet rooms on campus,” new completely redesigned fully accessible Men’s and Women’s located adjacent to the Starbucks serve both Starbucks and Riverfront Center Food Court. Large-format tile walls and floors complements the Starbucks décor.

Work

UC Davis Tercero 4 Student Housing

UC Davis Tercero Student Housing Phase 4 received Silver for the 2019 Best in American Living Awards (BALA) in the Multifamily Student Housing category by The National Association of Home Builders (NAHB). The 506-bed Tercero 4 Student Housing project, Mogavero’s third housing project on the UC Davis Campus, is comprised of 10 floor communities in three four story buildings in the Tercero District. The building massing recognizes the desire lines from the project toward the center of campus (NE), the “food path” to the Dining Commons (NW) and the connection to the Tercero Quad (W). High activity rooms at the entry emphasize the dynamic quality of entry to the courtyard. The site is organized around five primary elements. Pavilion: The Community Room is treated as a pavilion structure that clearly states its importance for project’s tenants, the Tercero neighborhood and the first time visitor. The one story form provides a look-thru and look-over, exposing layers of the spaces beyond, giving a sense of what lies ahead. Plaza: The main entry to the courtyard will be a very active plaza with comings and goings to the Dining Commons, Tercero Student Services and being flanked by the two highest energy spaces of the project, the Large Meeting Room and the Recreation Room Patio: The large roof overhang and trellis surrounding the Large Meeting Room protects the Patio, providing a space to meet, before and after an event or just on the way to dinner. Porch: The entry to each building is identified by the stack of floor lounges above and a front porch. Slightly elevated from the adjacent landscape the space is defined by surrounding seat walls which provide a place to hang out or just wait to meet your friends. The space is partially covered by the floor lounges above providing protection from the sun and rain for year round use. Park: Signifying the heart of the community, equally accessed from each of the residential entries, the Park provides a patch of green for casual hangout. The only turf area on the project will be irrigated through sub-surface gray water captured from sinks and showers. The building block of the residential floor plans is a cluster of five bedrooms which share a common bathroom. The cluster design includes a clear definition of “porch” space defining each cluster along the hallway. A collection of six clusters forms a floor community which has been carefully planned to reinforce this first level of community within each floor.

Work

Chico Avenues

The Avenues was a strategic visioning exercise in Chico, to help the community quantify its goals while developing specific approaches to meeting those goals. With considerable community involvement during a charette process, excellent input and a clear vision emerged, and the resulting analysis and recommendations have been adopted as official goals, helping to guide planning in this portion of Chico. The residents of the Avenues neighborhood made clear the things they wanted: complete streets and improved streetscapes leading to both an improved retail environment and a better residential neighborhood. The neighborhood association was very involved from the inception of the process through the charette process. The existing conditions and space inventory were led by members of the neighborhood association on bicycles, covering the entire scope of the study area. After the document was presented to the community, it was embraced with such enthusiasm that the neighborhood association fought to champion it with the City Council, and succeeded.

Work

Freedom Park Drive – Specific Plan

Our firm assisted the Sacramento Housing and Redevelopment Agency and the North Highlands community in creating preemptive community development strategies in anticipation of the closure of McClellan AFB and in developing post closure land use strategies. The final product, a compilation of community based ideas and sound planning principles was fashioned into a community action plan entitled ‘Vision for North Highlands’. This document has since guided government agencies, organizations and individuals, spurring the formation of the North Highlands Visions Task Force. Subsequent to the Vision Plan, we worked with the community to author a development code, the purpose of which was to create an implementing tool for carrying out the vision, goals, and policies embodied in the Community Plan. The Development Code contains three main components: definitions, a regulating plan, and district guidelines for density, development, site design, streetscape and lighting, signage, and noise.

Work

Loma Rica Ranch – Specific Plan

Originally approved as a thoroughbred horse ranch, Loma Rica Ranch in the Nevada County foothills was poised for development. Our firm was asked to provide concept and schematic designs for development, including a program summary, constraints analysis, draft and final schematic plans, and a measured base plan. The ranch is surrounded by a bustling commercial district, business parks, medical complexes, market-rate and multi-family housing, and presents an ideal infill development opportunity. Using high-density, mixed-use product and best management practices, development will be clustered to preserve sensitive habitat and provide substantial quantities of open space for active and passive recreation. An alternative water treatment plant will be utilized and sustainable, energy-efficient programs will be implemented.

Work

Fair Oaks Village Plan

The Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Committee was formed to pursue improvements for this unique portion of the community to provide a means to preserve and enhance the historic, neighborhood serving village through a collaborative process. The committee partnered with Sacramento County, the Fair Oaks Chamber of Commerce, Mogavero Architects and others to guide improvements to the Village’s commercial area, resulting in the creation of a visioning document. The Village Enhancement Vision provided an opportunity for community members to shape the neighborhood where they live and work. The visioning process addressed land use, zoning, transportation, and urban design. The goal of the Village Enhancement report was to summarize the work completed to date and to provide a document that could be used to implement a shared vision over a period of time.

Work

Grass Valley Downtown – Strategic Plan

The critical role of Downtown Grass Valley as the economic and cultural heart of the community was recognized by the City’s 2020 General Plan. This Plan identifies Downtown as the preferred location for various public amenities such as a community plaza, performing arts center and central transit facilities, as well as the logical center for a balanced mix of land uses including retail and service¬†commercial, office and affordable housing. The purpose of the Downtown Strategic Plan was to translate the broad goals and visions of the General Plan into specific priorities and implementation activities. The desired outcome of the Strategic Plan would: Identify “highest and best use” potentials for vacant parcels and opportunities for redevelopment/reuse of developed, but underutilized properties throughout the planning area; Develop strategies for job generation and affordable housing opportunities; Define location opportunities and cost estimates for development of public improvements, facilities or amenities which would strengthen the sense of place and economic vitality of the planning area Identify potential funding resources for implementing needed and desired public improvement, facilities or amenities.

Work

Grass Valley – General Plan Update

Located in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada, Grass Valley is a Gold Rush era town with significant historical resources; Mogavero Architects helped the City of Grass Valley update its General Plan in October of 2006. Prior to this effort, the City of Grass Valley was experiencing significant population growth and housing demand. As such, this planning effort focused on issues such as how to grow while maintaining its small town feel along with how to ensure that residents had a variety of housing options. As a result, the Workforce Housing Task Force was formed to help address residents’ concerns about a lack of affordable, work force housing in addition to overall community form. Over the last 25 years, there has been substantial low-density residential and commercial growth in the city as well as beyond city limits creating significant transportation and community connectivity problems. The downtown had already undergone substantial revitalization, but challenges in newer parts of town included traffic congestion and lack of mobility options. Our firm’s work focused on preparing the Urban Design Element which planned for the integration of urban form and transportation as well as connectivity for three new areas proposed for annexation to the city. The firm also facilitated the participation of a very active citizen base concerned about growth, its impacts on the community at-large, and the resultant built environment.

Work

Good Project

Good is a high-density residential project in West Sacramento with a site plan that includes 33 single-family detached homes and two duplexes with a mix of two and three-story building types. With ground floor garages, each home has living areas and a balcony on the second level with bedrooms on the ground floor as well as on the second or third floors. Each of the homes has elevated front stoops that are situated along an internal lane similar to the historic alley pattern of the surrounding neighborhood. Unique to this project site are four large oak trees on the southwest corner of the site that have been preserved within an urban park. The park is an asset for the project, but also serves as a front porch to the community. The site has a community garden and open space situated around four heritage oak trees and an urban park. The park serves as a front porch to the community and can be observed by ground floor studios or offices and second floor decks.

Work

Metro Square

Located near downtown Sacramento, Metro Square was developed through a partnership between a merchant builder and the local redevelopment agency. This infill market-rate single family housing project helped transform the central city housing market. The project featured 45 single family homes on 2.2 acres (21 dwelling units to the acre) which ranged in size from 1,150 square feet to 1,550 square feet. Each unit has a front porch, a small private backyard, and a one or two car garage tucked under the unit. The 2-story homes offered two to three bedrooms, and up to two and one half baths. Some plans featured dual master suites, den/library or private decks. The Redevelopment Agency loaned the developer $1.2 million to reduce the land costs and mitigate the risk of building in the central city rather than in the suburbs. Architectural design balanced contemporary construction needs with the existing character of the neighborhood. A central courtyard serves as a focal point for community interaction. The street appearance of the project conformed to that of an early 20th century residential neighborhood, while the interior emphasized community interaction and contemporary development. This project included primarily one car garages discouraging auto ownership, roof orientation for photovoltaic retrofits, surface drainage to reduce water pollutants, and architectural character sympathetic to the existing neighborhood. Making it more inviting to pedestrians and bicyclists, Metro Square has connected streets, bicycle network markings, crosswalks and other traffic controls at intersections, traffic-calming measures, and shade trees along its sidewalks.