Mogavero Architects

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UOP Calaveras Hall Student Housing

Calaveras Hall is latest student housing project on the University of the Pacific campus for Second Year Students. The project houses 381 students in 141 apartment units in two 4-story buildings. The buildings have the feel of a place of higher education, providing for informal interaction with a variety of learning opportunities through differing levels of interface and collaboration. The project unites with the UOP Campus through its architecture, color, materials and pedestrian connections to the main campus. The design reflects esthetic references to the materials and architectural responses of the 1920’s Collegiate Gothic style buildings on campus. The building is of its time without attempting to recreate one of the older campus structures. It succeeds in its connection to the old while communicating an exciting, interesting building for a new generation of students. The visual and physical connection across the river from the main campus helps stitch together the two sides of the university grounds through an entry tower and plaza which functions as a landing point on the north side of the bridge spanning the Stanislaus River. The connectivity to the broader San Joaquin Valley and Delta region is demonstrated through its response to the climate and the landscape which integrates with the adjacent river habitat. The building design is a distinct representation of its residential character while clearly identifying the different programmatic elements within the project. The main “events” of the building are emphasized through form and materials. The tower at the East Entry serves as a beacon to connect the north side of campus across the river. In association with the East Entry tower, a colonnade clearly demonstrates the path of the entry sequence from the east plaza to the main entry point at the center of the linear site. The North Entry is a secondary entrance from the parking area and is an outward face to edge of campus across the recreation fields. The tower form reflects the design of the main East Entry, but at a more modest scale. The common spaces at the heart of community are visually prominent upon approach from the main campus. These congregation areas on the ground floor of the southern wing are identified with greater transparency and a loggia which wraps the spaces, providing a shaded, protected space to congregate during rainy days or the during the hot months in the San Joaquin Valley.

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Sierra Vista Homes Phase I

A new affordable housing community replaces aging buildings and resident facilities, and will provide additional units and amenities for existing and future tenants. The redevelopment includes increased residential density from 9 units to 16 units per acre. Family housing consisting of one, two, three and four bedroom units will be arranged in a pedestrian-focused relationship to garden courts and streets with separated sidewalks. A large community center with pool and adjacent basketball half-court, along with with tot lots and play areas will encourage interaction between families, young children and older generations. The first phase of a 43-acre master plan replaces housing built in the early 1950’s with energy efficient affordable residences centered around common spaces. Secondary paths and routes to the neighborhood elementary school are planned for safe routes to school. Improvements of streetscape, accessible crossings and connections to the greater community will aid in increasing pedestrian pathways to school and public transportation. The site design and current access to public transportation allows the project to pursue parking reductions to one parking space per unit. Bicycle parking has also been provided at one space per unit. Laundry facilities will be provided in the common areas, as well as a hook-up in each unit. All ground floor units are designed to be adaptable, with upper units at 10% accessibility following the same floor plan. Storm water mitigation approaches will help to shape the landscape with bio-swales and retention basins reminiscent of local wetlands. A selection of native plant species has been chosen to support these systems and to provide interpretive learning landscapes for outdoor education. Helping to alleviate the burden of utility expenses and offset the carbon footprint, the project is designed to be Net Zero. Current commitments are at minimum 40% solar PV offset of residential load and 100% common load. Common hot water systems for each building are arranged to support future solar hot water.

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The Lohse Apartments

The Urban Land Institute (ULI) Sacramento honors Mogavero Architects and Mercy Housing California for our work on The Lohse Apartments as the 2019 Suburban Project of the Year. The Lohse Apartments in the City of Roseville accomplishes the goals of the “Downtown Specific Plan” with new residential development, facilities to support the entertainment district, and enhancement of the civic core with restaurants, and retail. The Mercy Housing development is located on one of the catalyst sites identified by the City as priority for implementation of their Downtown Specific Plan. The 4-story building with a total of 58 residential units sits over subterranean parking. The central outdoor court, and the first floor common area have many amenities for the residents. In addition, 2,500 square feet of commercial space is available for retail use. The project was designed to intensify the development footprint along Vernon Street in Downtown Roseville. The design emphasizes a substantial urban scale with larger volumes and more formal brick materials. The building height along the streets is increased along Vernon and Bulen Streets to transition to a more urban district. The design diminishes in scale as it moves from Vernon Street to the alley to recognize the lower scale of the existing uses across the alley and the lowering of the land elevations towards the alley. This is accomplished by reducing the number of stories, and scale of volumes. 150 feet of the 235 linear feet of The Lohse Apartments’ frontage has commercial and active common areas, with a corner pace for outdoor café seating at the ground level. The retail spaces are set back five feet from the sidewalk with a projected canopy above to allow for outdoor sales or additional café seating. The building management office space provides excellent surveillance of the street, building access circulation and common areas. Associated with the main entry to the residential community is space that can function for community events. This common space can be expanded to include the foyer, multipurpose room, or circulation space for special occasions such as Downtown Roseville’s monthly art event. The residential units were designed to have maximized light quality and natural ventilation, with a large percentage of corner units. All units have mechanically augmented nighttime ventilation cooling to take advantage of the cooler nighttime summer temperatures. The City of Roseville created a video highlighting The Lohse and further development projects, including mention of Main Street Plaza also designed by of Mogavero Architects. Check it out here: City of Roseville Video View our blog about the Grand Opening of The Lohse and the artwork displayed throughout the building.

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Lavender Courtyard

Mogavero Architects is proud to have designed Sacramento’s first LGBT-friendly affordable senior housing development. Located in vibrant Midtown — close to transit, downtown and nearby Lavender Heights — Lavender Courtyard by Mutual Housing California will provide 50+ energy efficient residential units for an aging population often displaced by rising housing costs and marginalized in mainstream senior facilities. We believe sustainable design has the power to extend beyond the building envelope and into the heart and soul of community.  This project will transform a vacant and blighted lot into a place for social service, meal delivery, potential commercial use, community events, cultural heritage, social engagement, landscape, and energy production while providing a safe, and comfortable home for all its residents. Everyone deserves the opportunity to thrive in place — regardless of income, identity, age or race. We welcome this new addition to our portfolio and much more importantly, to our community. SPECIALIZED APPROACHES Supports healthy Urban Communities Urban infill and transit oriented development Designed around common rooms and a courtyard to enhance community and social engagement Pedestrian and bicycle friendly Ground floor common and commercial street frontage enhances economic opportunity and community interaction Attractive, modern design Promotes safety, comfort and liveliness for residents and neighbors Reduced Impact on environmental resources Focus on reduced energy consumption Designed to achieve zero net energy Designed to achieve rooftop solar PVs Designed to achieve laundry-to-landscape graywater irrigation system Water efficient landscape design Passive solar design approach Natural ventilation On-site storm water management Sustainable streetscape design Check out the following media links for more information: https://www.comstocksmag.com/web-only/lavender-courtyard-will-be-central-valleys-first-affordable-housing-community-lgbtq-seniors http://www.mutualhousing.com/supportive-neighborhood-heart-lavender-courtyards-community/ http://www.mutualhousing.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/Weinberg-Foundation-press-release-Weinberg-FINAL.pdf http://amp.sacbee.com/news/local/article220879475.html https://issuu.com/outwordmagazine/docs/603_beach_rats_web  

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Mather Veterans Village Phase One

Located just blocks from the Sacramento Valley VA Hospital, the first phase of the Mather Veterans Village helps to address the large need for service-supported housing for low-income, disabled veterans in the Northern California region. The first phase includes 50 residential units, and occupies the south west section of the site. The building is a “C” shaped, 3-story building that wraps around a shared green space and courtyard. All of the units are connected by an elevator-accessed walkway that also serves as a shared balcony to encourage socialization of this special needs population. This “single loaded” exterior walkway also provides the residents with the opportunity to use cross ventilation for cooling the units by catching Sacramento’s prevailing winds and the “Delta Breeze.” The building is being designed with maximum energy efficiency and best green building practices like central hot water and a solar thermal array. All landscape irrigation will be generated from on site greywater. The project is designed be at least 25% better than California’s energy code and Green Communities certified. Amenities for the residents include a community room, computer terminals, extensive on-site services and well as significant outdoor courtyard. SPECIALIZED APPROACHES Greywater from showers and lavatories provide virtually all landscape irrigation Three solar thermal arrays provide the hot water for all units Radiant Barrier Enterprise Green Certified and Energy Star Building Certified Natural ventilation Low VOC materials Sun shading On-site storm water management Designed around common area courtyard and community building Special needs services Excellent proximity to VA Hospital Bike friendly Water Efficient Landscape Design Reused Old Military Infirmary Building for community space

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West Gateway Place

2017 Platinum Winner – NAHB’s Best in American Living Awards 2018 Gold Nugget Award of Merit – PCBC Best Affordable Housing Community Comprised of studios, one and two bedroom residences, West Gateway Place is a 77 unit, family, affordable, mixed-use community in West Sacramento’s Bridge District. The buildings present an entry to the City of West Sacramento and the master planned Bridge District, that includes the Rivercats Baseball Stadium and downtown. Located on the approach to the city’s famed Tower Bridge and the State Capitol, the buildings are the first significant structure upon entrance to the City. The alternating colors of the north elevation with deep shadows and white “fins” are intended to offer an interesting change of elevation. West Gateway Place was the first affordable housing development to finish construction that was funded by “Cap & Trade” funding (California’s Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund) through the Affordable Housing and Sustainable Communities Program. The mixed-use, infill development is located near public transit, bike paths, pedestrian walkways, shopping and other amenities that easily allows residents to be car-free, saving them money and sparing the air from pollution. A strong tower element design at the corner of Tower Bridge Gateway (TBG) and Grand Street, along with an elevated café-retail terrace, welcome residents and visitors to the Bridge District’s west entry. The mixed-use building offers 4,000 square feet of retail space with dedicated parking tucked under the building directly connected to TBG. Two buildings, each 4 stories tall, enclose a central courtyard with seating and a play area. Individual balconies, common laundry space, and the community room lounge open onto the courtyard to provide a healthy connection to the active spaces.

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515 T Street

The T street development project includes construction of 11 new multi-family homes and renovating an existing 4-plex into a building with three units; for a total of 14 units. While being sensitive to the existing historic neighborhood in which it sits, the new apartment building does not mimic it. It was not our intent to create a false sense of history, rather a respectful modern counterpart to the existing context. This is accomplished with massing, use of materials, and similar details. To diminish the overall scale of the new building, the third level is a different color and material, and steps back. Lap siding, colored window trim, and porch detailing support the look of the neighborhood. Through massing, finishes and color, the new building is “broken up” into three smaller sections to reduce the scale to something similar of the adjacent structures in the neighborhood. A courtyard is centrally located on the site to provide outdoor space and circulation. This courtyard was strategically positioned to have cool summer shade and includes a BBQ, seating area, edible planting, bicycle racks, and access to all dwelling units; thus creating a strong sense of community. In addition to the central courtyard, every upper level unit has a private balcony to provide eyes on the street which enhances the sense of security and community for the neighborhood. SPECIALIZED APPROACHES Radiant barrier The roof is a cool, single ply roof.Central hot water boiler that is pre-plumbed for a solar hot water panel Conduit for future photovoltaicsLow VOC materials Highly energy efficient mechanical units Natural day lighting High U value windows and high performance glazing

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CSUS Riverfront Center / Starbuck’s Coffee

CSUS Riverfront Center Starbucks was the complete transformation of an existing Copy Center in a 75-year-old building into what has become one of the Campus’ social hubs. The 1,300 square-foot Starbucks Café is joined by the Coffee Bar, back-of-house Work Area and a 500 square-foot Community Room with space for 35 students to comfortably gather to socialize of study. Starbucks is adjacent to the Riverfront Center Food Court which was remodeled by Mogavero Architects in 2010. The interior features large-format floor tile floors and reclaimed wood walls and ceilings. There are comfortable built in banquettes and movable seating around tables and built-in dining bars. Large operable windows opening out to the adjacent dining patio provide ample natural ventilation which is assisted by specially controlled fans. Contact switches on the windows tell the cooling or heating portion of the system to shut off when the windows are open. Replacing what were universally known as “the worst toilet rooms on campus,” new completely redesigned fully accessible Men’s and Women’s located adjacent to the Starbucks serve both Starbucks and Riverfront Center Food Court. Large-format tile walls and floors complements the Starbucks décor.

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City View at Van Ness

This award-winning project features 45 units in three stories above ground floor retail space, showcasing residential common spaces on the street frontages. The mix of studios, one bedroom and two bedroom apartments are arranged facing the second floor terrace or public rights of way. Parking and utilities are accessed from the alley. The southern facade is punctuated by the mid-block residential entry accessing the community room, management offices and the upper three floors of residential. The open stair in the lobby connects to the second floor terrace providing an outdoor common space for all residential units. The main stair overlooks the terrace, connecting residents to the center of the community. Influenced by historical examples, the building does not attempt to replicate an old building. The project complies with the existing zoning, as well as the future Downtown Development Code through an interactive process with the staff of the Housing Authority, Planning, and Downtown Revitalization. The building’s strong masonry base features the elements of traditional storefront design. The residential floors above sit on and overlap the base expressing a design that recognizes the context of a lower cornice line (one and two stories) and translates a design that would have occurred if the existing walls had remained. The extant of the base relates to the original Droge facade. The movement of the upper floor massing in relation to the base communicates program elements such as: Corner massing importance Retail storefront Residential entry Second floor terrace Additional articulation focuses on: Security through surveillance Community Apartment individuality Recognizing the importance of the history of the site, it is proposed that significant historical events within the building be communicated through artwork in the building’s facade.

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Helios

A new 5 story mixed use building planned for University Avenue near the heart of Berkeley, California. Ground floor retail is located at the corner and extends down University Avenue with a live/work unit at the west end. Of the 36 apartment units, there will be 3 affordable units for households earning up to 50 percent of Area Median Income. A long tradition of environmental principals and community oriented design in Berkeley has shaped this project into a complimentary addition to the neighborhood. The project consists of studio, 1 and 2 bedroom units wrapping around a central court. Construction will be a poured in place concrete podium with wood frame above. All units have access to private balconies and there is a community roof garden and terrace at the fifth floor with 360 degree views of the Golden Gate Bridge, hills and bay. A small stand of existing redwood trees are preserved at the inside corner of the site. The project is Green Point rated at 114 points and includes solar hot water on the roof. Energy performance will be 10 percent better than 2013 T24. Conceptual Design for the project was completed by Serina Calhoun, Syncopated Architecture. Mogavero Notestine Associates will be Architect of Record, and will complete the project in conjunction with Brown Construction. Our long working relationship with Brown Construction of 25+ years is crucial to completion of the project within a very tight budget and on schedule.